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Hooked On Cheese: Wine Pairings with Sommelier, Cheesemaker Jessica Little

Hooked On Cheese: Wine Pairings with Sommelier, Cheesemaker Jessica Little

Last weekend, I went down to Georgia to visit one of my favorite people, Jessica Little of Sweet Grass Dairy. In addition to her and her family being stellar cheesemakers, Jessica is a Certified Sommelier through The Court of Master Sommeliers, and I knew she was the perfect person to go to for some knockout suggestions for this project.

So here are her pairings for five of the best American Original cheeses out there. Enjoy!

Green Hill
“Because I am a farm girl at heart, I love to pair Green Hill with a grower champagne. I can appreciate how hard it is to not only farm the land but also be dedicated to the craft of production. One my favorite Grower Champagnes is NV Vilmart & Cie Grand Cellier Brut, Premier Cru Montagne de Reims. It is 70% Chardonnay/30% Pinot Noir and oak barrel fermented for a richer, more unctuous style. The bubbles cut right through the fat of the double cream of the cheese. This pairing has become one of my New Year's Eve highlights.

Of course, also being a simple farm girl, I can enjoy a well-made prosecco like one from Scarpetta or Zardetto with the Green Hill as well. Those are my go-to everyday sparklers.”

Humboldt Fog
“The first time I heard Max McCalman say, ‘what grows together, goes together,’ I immediately understood why Sauvignon Blanc from the Loire goes so well with goat cheeses. My go-to importer for Loire Valley wines is Jon-David Headrick Selections. His wines are stunning, with so much character and flavor. The two that have paired well with Humboldt Fog are Claude Riffault Sancerre ‘Les Boucauds’ and Jean-Francois Merieau ‘L'Arpent de Vaudons’ Sauvignon Blanc. The crisp acidity, elegant minerality, and freshness bring out the tangy and earthy flavors in the cheese. This is one of my favorite springtime pairings.”

Pleasant Ridge Reserve
“I was recently in Denver at a cheese event and had the honor of hanging out with Andy Hatch. He is one of the most admired cheesemakers in the country (if not the world!) and we got into a conversation about the complexity of flavors in his Pleasant Ridge Reserve cheese. I really love the secondary flavors of black olives and dried green herbs, so when thinking of wine pairings, I try to highlight those flavors. One of my favorite domestic producers is Arnot-Roberts in northern California. The 2015 Arnot-Roberts Sonoma Coast Syrah is amazing. It is made in a very old fashioned way – whole-cluster fermented with native yeasts, aged in neutral French oak barrels, and unfiltered/unrefined. Nathan Roberts and Duncan Arnot make wine in an old world style but with new world flavors. I like to think that Jeremy and I also make old world inspired cheeses with new world flavored milk.

Another great pairing for Pleasant Ridge Reserve is Spanish Rioja. My favorite producers are Bodegas Muga (try their Prado Enea Gran Reserva), Lopez de Heredia, and La Rioja Alta.”

Grayson
“Grayson is such a fun cheese to include in a wine tasting. I have poured bubbles, unoaked whites, off-dry, and red wines with this washed-rind cheese. My personal favorite is a Barbaresco from Piedmont in northern Italy. If I had to drink wine from one red grape every day for the rest of my life, it would be Nebbiolo. I love the high acid, high tannin, and Italian funkiness of Nebbiolo. One of my go-to producers is a co-op of 52 different members called Produttori del Barbaresco. They make very consistent and tasty blended and single-vineyard Barbaresco. I also love anything from Bruno Giacosa or Giuseppe Cortese as well.”

Rogue Smokey Blue
“In our cheese shop and restaurant, I have frequently said that Chenin Blanc is one of the most underappreciated white grape varietals in the world. The searing high acidity, higher viscosity, and frequent notes of tropical or stone fruits, honey, and ginger play so well with cheese. I love to finish a meal with a dessert wine and a blue cheese like Smokey Blue. The 2010 Domaine Des Baumard Quarts de Chaume is mind-blowing. Seriously complex with a finish that lasts for days, it is a great pairing for the salty, smoky, pungent blue flavors. If you like something a little drier but still off-dry, try the Damien Laureau Savennieres ‘Le Bel Ouvrage.’ Damien Laureau is a rock star with Chenin Blanc.”

You can follow Raymond's cheese adventures on Facebook, Twitter, and his website. Additional reporting by Madeleine James.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


A t The Farmer’s Daughter in Sidney, sommelier Tom Dai spends his days looking for the perfect wine to match the cheeses sold in the dual-purpose shop.

Dai’s domain is the wine bar, which stretches behind partner Jessica Sommer’s well-stocked cheese case in the bright, contemporary space. With several artisan cheese-and-wine flights to try, it’s the perfect place to settle in to explore this delicious symbiosis.

“If a wine has smoky notes, we look for a cheese that has smoky flavours. For a cheese with a mushroomy rind, we look for a wine that has earthy notes,” Dai says as he delivers a regional pairing, complete with detailed tasting notes for both cheese and wine.

The world of cheese is vast, but there are many new opportunities to learn more about the affinity between these age-old products of fermentation. From the curated cheese board at your local wine bar to a technical tasting with a cheese expert, or a cheese club that brings rare local cheeses directly to your door, artisan cheese is gaining new cachet.

B.C. is becoming a great destination for cheese lovers. Just a few to try include, clockwise from top left: tangy Poplar Grove Tiger Blue semi-soft Farm House Alpine Gold creamy Salt Spring Island Juliette wine-soaked Little Qualicum Cheeseworks Tipsy Jill nutty Kootenay Alpine Cheese Co. Alpindon and the pungent, beer-washed Haltwhistle PennyMede. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At Upper Bench Winery and Creamery near Penticton, Shana Miller makes cheeses that complement her husband Gavin Miller’s big Bordeaux-style wines. It’s the only winery in the country where both wine and cheese are produced on site, with a tasting bar where you can sample both, and a pizza oven on the patio for authentic Neapolitan pizzas topped (naturally) with their own cheese. They also have a Curds & Corks Club, conveniently delivering their perfectly paired wines and cheeses to your door.

Visitors to the winery and club members alike eat up Miller’s big, Stilton-style King Cole blue, buttery U&Brie and lovely Upper Bench Gold cheeses.

When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.

“We’re in a state of growth now because we can’t keep up,” says the cheesemaker, who times her cheeses to the latest wine releases. “Our club members get six bottles of wine and three cheeses every three months. When Gavin’s bottling rosé, I’m definitely making Brie.”

Rich, tangy, slightly salty: The powerhouse Poplar Grove Tiger Blue can stand up to a bold red wine like Cabernet Franc. Jennifer Gauthier photo

At the nearby Lock & Worth winery, Poplar Grove cheeses are on the tasting room menu. Studies show cheese improves the experience of tasting wine, says cheesemaker Gitta Pedersen.

When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced.

“When they taste the cheese along with the wine, people come away with a whole new sensation, understanding how both are enhanced,” says Pedersen, whose four cheeses, including the washed-rind Harvest Moon and richly veined Tiger Blue, are offered with four Lock & Worth wines.

You’ll find cheese boards—and wine-and-cheese pairings—at many restaurants, too. Forage in Vancouver will pair a flight of B.C. wines with local cheeses to start your meal. An assiette de fromage starts the meal at Au Comptoir, while a selection of cheeses is offered, in French style, with the desserts at Hawksworth and Le Crocodile.

And if you want to get really serious about cheese, there’s the new L’Apéro Cheese Tasting Experience in Victoria, with cheese tasting workshops, and wine and cheese tasting parties, scheduled throughout the year (aperocheeseexperience.com).

So whether it’s the creamy Ruckles goat cheese from Salt Spring Island, the mozzarella di bufala made from water buffalo milk at Natural Pastures, or the beautiful Brie from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters, B.C. artisan makers are busy.

The French monk and writer François Rabelais called cheese, wine and bread the “Holy Trinity of the table”—and it’s still the easiest way to entertain.


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