New recipes

New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations

New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations

The Health Department supposedly turns a blind eye to inspecting food carts and keeping them in check

You may want to re-think your regular Halal lunch. Who knows what’s in that white sauce?

Food carts are a regular part of New York City’s streetscape, from the sweet-smelling almonds to the iconic pretzels and hot dogs on almost every street corner in midtown Manhattan. As it turns out, street food carts are dirtier than you thought (well, where did you think the terms “dirty water dogs” came from anyway?). In an exclusive report, The Daily News uncovered 359 reported complaints over the past three years in Manhattan alone of people getting sick from food cart food.

Critics of the carts’ overall cleanliness claim that the Department of Health very rarely inspects these carts or upholds them to the standards of restaurants.

“It’s very loose, the enforcement,” said Daniel Biederman, president of the 34th Street Partnership. “We’ve been asking the Health Department, and Consumer Affairs, and the police to get together with regulations on appearance and cleanliness. It seems like a hopeless case.”

People who issued 311 calls about eating gnarly street food reported cases of bad diarrhea, vomiting, and sharp stomach pains for days on end. Food handlers have been caught working without gloves or hair coverings, and even scooping up spilled food off of the sidewalk. But what is being done about it? In the last two years, 11,268 violations were handed out, according to the Department of Health, but only 24 operations were actually shut down.

For the latest happenings in the food and drink world, visit our Food News page.

Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @JoannaFantozzi


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


New York Food Carts Whip Up Food Poisoning and Health Violations - Recipes

The tremendous power of chain restaurants was demonstrated once again in my part of the world yesterday, when one of our area bloggers decided to pack it in after a single visit to Olive Garden. That&rsquos a shame, because her blog was quite good.

Before commenting on that, let me get this out of the way: chain restaurants suck most of the time. For some reason, they don&rsquot take reservations, so the popular dinner hour begins with a cattle-call lineup that often stretches out the door. Then there&rsquos the food, which is often either too salty or too greasy, and the drinks, which are either weak, overpriced cocktails or draft beer that tastes like the tap hasn&rsquot been cleaned in a month.

That all said, a lot of locally-owned restaurants also suck a great deal of the time. They pawn off food that was cooked and frozen somewhere else as their own, they are probably more likely to violate health codes, and they&rsquore less predictable over time than a chain.

What I don&rsquot get about chains is the extremity of reaction to them. There&rsquos the &ldquoApplebees salad bar&rdquo, &ldquoreal Americans eat here&rdquo response, which ignores the fact that a lot of the people eating at chains are doing so because it&rsquos the least worst alternative, or just didn&rsquot want to drive a few more miles, or because the chain offers up cheap food for kids. And there&rsquos the &ldquoindex of the apocalypse&rdquo response, where the chain is a symbol of all that&rsquos bad with our suburban/corporate car culture. I&rsquom more in the latter group, but I&rsquoll fess up that I&rsquove eaten at Olive Garden without having an existential crisis, and see no reason to go all emo about the popularity of chain restaurants. Almost everything that&rsquos popular is at best mediocre, and the sooner you understand that, the more likely you are to go find something less popular but better.


Watch the video: Αλλάζει τα δεδομένα η Δέλτα, ανεμβολίαστοι γεμίζουν τις ΜΕΘ (January 2022).