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The 5 Condiments You Should Never Buy and How to Make Them Instead

The 5 Condiments You Should Never Buy and How to Make Them Instead

Tired of buying subpar flavored condiments at the grocery store? Take matters into your own hands with these gourmet ideas for condiments that will elevate the flavor of any dish you serve, from a porterhouse steak to a humble hamburger.

We’ve started with our five favorite condiments to replicate at home. The fresh ingredients and simple techniques will go a long way in making your breakfast, lunch, or dinner taste just a little bit more gourmet.

Once you have grasped the basics, you can venture out from the usual. Instead of standard herb butters, pair flavors and textures like pepita seeds and lime or ancho powder and minced cilantro. Turn your usual tomato ketchup into a spicy Sriracha-ketchup dipping sauce or make a chipotle aioli with your basic mayonnaise.

Find your own flavor inspiration from the basic condiment recipes below that are simple to make at home.


Don’t waste money buying compound or flavored butters. Instead, gather your desired flavorings, butter, and a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Start off by softening your butter on the counter, and then paddle your butter in the stand mixer until fluffy. Now your butter is ready for additions like truffle oil, fresh minced herbs, or lime juice. Shape your butter and then set in the fridge or freezer to harden.


While you may be a loyal fan of a particular brand, just try making your own ketchup once, and you will taste the difference. Check-out this method for an easy slow-cooker ketchup or use sweet San Marzano tomatoes to make your perfect French fry condiment.


Nothing tastes like homemade mayonnaise. The consistency and mild flavor just can’t be replicated in a bottled product, so next time you go to make your favorite chicken salad or coleslaw, opt to make your own simple mayonnaise using fresh eggs, oil, and a squeeze of lemon juice.


If you ever find yourself without maple syrup on pancake day, don’t panic. You can turn almost any fruit into a sweet pancake syrup in no time. Try our recipe for a simple Cherry Syrup or skip the fruit in favor of a quick and easy Honey Syrup.


While a traditional pesto is made by combining basil, garlic, pine nuts, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and olive oil, you can make fresh pesto sauce with arugula, walnuts, kale, and more. Try out your pesto-making skills with our Roasted Tomatoes and Sage Pesto recipe.

Angela Carlos is the Cook Editor at The Daily Meal. Find her on Twitter and tweet @angelaccarlos.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.


The Ultimate Low-FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you've read tips on replacing onion and garlic before, rest-assured that I'm not here to repeat the conventional wisdom. For example, I won't tell you to just use scallion tops for everything, or rush out and buy asafoetida, the pungent Indian spice.

There's nothing wrong with the usual cooking advice aimed at FODMAPers, I just don't think it tells the whole story. There are other ways to cook incredibly flavorful food besides replacements that don't quite measure up to the real thing.

And when it comes to asafoetida as a substitute for onion flavor, I'll bust that myth right now:

Years before I learned about the FODMAP diet, I had a jar of asafoetida that I played with alongside all my other traditional Indian spices. (Remember, I'm a foodie who used to do recipe development for a living.)

Always used together with other spices, and at only 1/4 tsp for a recipe that serves 4, it mingles with the other ingredients to add a savory background funk.

But add a little too much to your spaghetti sauce for example, and suddenly your lovely sauce stinks like over-cooked cabbage. Unless you're cooking traditional Indian food, I say leave it on the shelf.