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Potted Stilton

Potted Stilton

Makes about 1 1/2 cups Servings

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup (4 tablespoons) Kerrygold Pure Irish unsalted butter, room temperature
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Process cheese, butter, and cayenne in a food processor until coarse purée forms. Season to taste with black pepper. Pack Stilton butter into a crock, smoothing top with a butter knife. Cover and chill for at least 1 day. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 week ahead. Keep chilled.

  • Let stand until room temperature, about 1 hour, and serve with toast points.

Recipe by Christopher Hirsheimer, Melissa HamiltonReviews Section

Mini Eccles Cakes with Potted Stilton

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Ingredients

Eccles Cakes

  • 100 g unsalted butter, diced
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 200 g currants
  • 25 g red wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp ground allspice
  • 640 g puff pastry, ready-rolled (2 sheets, see tip)
  • 1 medium egg
  • 2 tsp milk

Potted Stilton and Baking

  • 100 g Stilton, at room temperature
  • 50 g mascarpone
  • 75 g unsalted butter, diced
  • ½ tsp fine sea salt
  • 30 g sherry
  • 45 g water
  • ½ tsp sherry vinegar

What is potting?

Potting food is one of the oldest ways of preserving it for later use.

Originally food would be minced or pounded into a paste like consistancy have spices added and mixed with butter. The potted food would then be covered with a layer of clarified butter to seal and thus preserve it.

Meat, fish and cheese were potted.

You can still buy potted meat in some butcher shops and potted shrimps are available in some supermarkets.


Potted Stilton with Apple

Ingredients

Method

One year, as usual I had the ubiquitous leftover Stilton cheese sitting in my larder. You know what it’s like – you buy too much in the pre-Christmas shopping fest and then you’re left with the stinky stuff and no real desire to eat it.

I hate waste and rarely chuck anything away. My fridge is testament to this. So I did what hundreds of sensible cooks have done before me – potted the beggar! Mixed with some apple, livened up with some lemon and softened by cream, potted Stilton made it into my top ten favourite dishes. Completely scrumptious with a warm chutney on a crisp cracker and a large glass of rich red wine.

Crumble the Stilton into a medium mixing bowl.

Grate both apples onto the Stilton. Add the lemon zest and juice and stir well to prevent the apples from browning. Add the cream and season with a little black pepper. Mix well.

Spoon the mixture into a serving dish and serve with crackers or spread it on some squidgy warm bread rolls and serve with Pear and cranberry chutney.

Lotte’s tips
This lasts for a week in the fridge if you seal the surface with some clarified butter.


Potted stilton recipe

One year, as usual I had the ubiquitous leftover Stilton cheese sitting in my larder. You know what it&rsquos like &ndash you buy too much in the pre-Christmas shopping fest and then you&rsquore left with the stinky stuff and no real desire to eat it.

I hate waste and rarely chuck anything away. My fridge is testament to this. So I did what hundreds of sensible cooks have done before me &ndash potted the beggar!

Mixed with some apple, livened up with some lemon and softened by cream, potted Stilton made it into my top ten favourite dishes. Completely scrumptious with a warm chutney on a crisp cracker and a large glass of rich red wine.

Ingredients

  • 350 g Stilton cheese
  • 1 Large dessert apple, peeled
  • 1 Small cooking apple, peeled
  • 1 Grated zest and juice of ½ lemon
  • 5 tbsp Single cream
  • 1 Pinch of freshly ground black pepper
  • 12.3 oz Stilton cheese
  • 1 Large dessert apple, peeled
  • 1 Small cooking apple, peeled
  • 1 Grated zest and juice of ½ lemon
  • 5 tbsp Single cream
  • 1 Pinch of freshly ground black pepper
  • 12.3 oz Stilton cheese
  • 1 Large dessert apple, peeled
  • 1 Small cooking apple, peeled
  • 1 Grated zest and juice of ½ lemon
  • 5 tbsp Single cream
  • 1 Pinch of freshly ground black pepper

Details

  • Cuisine: British
  • Recipe Type: Starter
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Preparation Time: 20 mins
  • Cooking Time: 20 mins
  • Serves: 4

Step-by-step

  1. Crumble the Stilton into a medium mixing bowl.
  2. Grate both apples onto the Stilton. Add the lemon zest and juice and stir well to prevent the apples from browning. Add the cream and season with a little black pepper. Mix well.
  3. Spoon the mixture into a serving dish and serve with crackers or spread it on some squidgy warm bread rolls and serve with Pear and cranberry chutney.

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Port and Stilton: Traditional Serving Methods and an Explanation

The most widely recognised tradition with regard to port is probably that it should always be passed to the left at the dinner table. This tradition aside, port is known very often as an after-dinner drink, frequently served with Stilton or to complement a more comprehensive cheeseboard offering. There are some traditionalists who will be surprised by the way in which some of the serving suggestions included in this article stray significantly from these established parameters, so I thought I would take a moment to explain why I am suggesting these variations on what is often such an inflexible concept.

There are occasions in the culinary world where it is undeniably wrong to attempt to improve upon perceived perfection. This would be especially true where a dish is comprised of ingredients with very delicate flavours that could easily be overwhelmed. In the case of port and Stilton, however, not only do both have very robust flavours, they are not so much a dish as a popular serving combination. It is these two facts, combined with a desire to further improve the port and Stilton experience, which led to the ideas laid out below. Some of these ideas are of course not entirely original, but hopefully, you can see something new in most of them and you will be prepared to give them a try, however traditional your tastes may be.

Ruby port and Stilton with oatcakes


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Please note that products and their ingredients are subject to change.Although this information is regularly updated, Fortnum & Mason is unable to accept liability for any incorrect information. Please note that the picture images show only our serving suggestions of how to prepare your food – all accessories and additional items and/or ingredients pictured with the product you are purchasing are not included. This data is supplied for personal use only. It may not be reproduced in any way whatsoever without Fortnum & Mason's prior consent, nor without due acknowledgement.


Eccles Cakes and Potted Stilton.

Eccles Cakes are a bit of an enigma. Nobody actually knows their true origins except that they have been sold in a town called Eccles(Greater Manchester) since 1793. They were traditionally made with flaky pastry, I believe a more modern interpretation lends itself to puff though. These are found in many shops today but if you follow the link they don’t look particularly appestising. They are usually made with currants and hence have adopted a nickname of dead fly cakes. I wanted to make these so that they came alive and one just wasn’t enough.

There is a strange tradition in some parts of Northern Britain that we eat Fruit Cake with cheese. This sounds quite odd but it gave me a theme to go with these cakes. They are full of dried fruit and so are basically a chutney in pastry, so I wanted to serve a cheese “spread” as an accompaniment in a role reversal of the cheese and chutney. I’ve also made these cakes with raisins rather than currants as they are juicier. These are fine cold, but if you can make them fresh and eat them warm all the better.

The two cheeses served above were a Spanish Picos Blue and a French Langres

Ingredients

  • 500g Sheet, ready rolled. Puff Pastry
  • 150g Raisins
  • 75g Butter
  • 125g Caster Sugar
  • 1 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar
  • 4g Ground Allspice
  • Egg Wash


In Praise of Stilton, the Perfect Holiday Cheese

Stilton has been made since at least as far back as the 18th century, when it was available at a coach house along the Great North Road outside of London. The massive cheeses became a souvenir for people going into and out of the city and eventually one of England’s favorite holiday treats.

“The smell of Stilton is, for me, the smell of December,” says Francis Percival, who lives above Neal’s Yard Dairy, London’s greatest cheese shop, where his wife, Bronwen, is the buyer. The Percivals, a cheese power couple, are the coauthors of Reinventing the Wheel, which makes a biological case for reviving prescientific cheesemaking methods and pays homage to the classic cheeses that have resisted the tide of industrialization in dairy farming.

Stilton Cheese Heami Lee

Why Christmas?

Stilton has long been associated with the holidays. Wheels made from plentiful summer milk begin to ripen toward the end of fall and are at their peak throughout winter.

“But if you look back,” Bronwen says, “people were eating this cheese aged for two years. At that point this whole seasonality thing kind of goes out the window. Back then, it was particularly suitable for festive occasions because it was expensive. People talked about it as the most rare, exotic, sought-after cheese available.”

Earn Your Stripes

Slice into a 16-pound drum of Stilton and you’ll likely notice a few thick, straight veins of blue mold cutting through the otherwise lacy, creamy paste. These lines are the result of piercing the cheese with long needles to hasten mold growth and speed up the ripening process. Francis says piercing originated as a “shady, ungentlemanly” practice that was most likely not part of the original Stilton method.

Today, it is unusual to come across an unpierced wheel. The specimen above is from Colston Bassett, a small dairy that pierces less than the larger producers—the cheese has less veining and breakdown, and a creamier, smoother paste.

Stilton Cheese

Full Size

The Percivals suggest buying freshly cut slices from a full-size wheel, rather than the petite 2-kilogram Stilton “truckles” or small crocks of potted Stilton that appear around the holidays.

“Put this down, signed by both of us: There is nothing worse than the idea that the potted Stilton is in some way a premium product,” says Francis. And with a smaller wheel, “you end up with a tremendous amount of rind to paste,” adds Bronwen. “They really dry out by the time they’re ripened, then they always tend to have this heavy, awkward texture and too much blue.”

What About Those Drips?

Stilton, like many blue cheeses, has a tendency to weep at room temperature the liquid is normal, and even desirable, evidence that the cheese has been stored and aged properly. “It’s a protein syrup that is being released by the cheese as it is breaking down,” says Bronwen. “I really like that liquor it means the cheeses are particularly succulent, and there’s a sweetness to it as well.”

In Good Company

The Percivals prefer to eat their Stilton at the end of a meal with a glass of something sweet. Tawny port is the classic accompaniment—there’s something alchemical about the combination of salt and sweetness—but Francis also suggests branching out into other fortified wines like madeira. Bronwen appreciates a well-aged barley wine, such as J.W. Lees Harvest Ale.

“This is the great thing about Christmas eating and drinking: It is an amazing opportunity to celebrate the eating habits of the 18th century,” says Francis. “I’m amazed anyone had any time for things like fighting then, because they must have all been blotto all the time. But if you want to serve some really sweet, high-alcohol wine at the end of the meal, then Stilton is absolutely the ideal accompaniment to it.”


Watch the video: Port u0026 Stilton with German subtitles (January 2022).