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Dunkin’ Donuts Has Already Launched Home Delivery in Select Cities

Dunkin’ Donuts Has Already Launched Home Delivery in Select Cities

Dunkin’ Donuts is finally testing home delivery in select markets, as well as mobile ordering options

Dunkin’ Donuts is finally testing home delivery in select markets, as well as mobile ordering options

As of this week, Dunkin’ Donuts has begun testing its home delivery service in Dallas, to be followed by locations in Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, and Washington, the company announced. The company is the latest chain to introduce delivery, following similar initiatives by Starbucks, McDonald’s, and Taco Bell.

Meanwhile, in Portland, Maine, 124 locations will now allow customers to place their orders ahead of time on the mobile app. Delivery orders can be placed either on the app or online at DoorDash, the third-party delivery service that will distribute those orders.

By early 2016, the company aims to make its mobile ordering option available nationwide.

“Our guests appreciate that we make our full menu available all day, and we are committed to seeking new ways to make our products even more accessible to our guests throughout the day,” said Scott Hudler, Dunkin’ Donuts vice president of global consumer engagement. “The ability to skip the line to order your favorite coffee, donut or sandwich any time of day, or to have Dunkin’ items delivered directly to you, are two things that our guests have been requesting for some time.”


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Dunkin' CMO explains the chain's controversial decision to slash ɽonuts' from its name

The transformation of Dunkin' Donuts to just Dunkin' has sparked massive backlash over the past year.

Social media erupted when news of the name change was announced in September. New Englanders fretted that the chain was abandoning its roots. Boston magazine even ran an article with the headline "Donut Break Our Hearts, Dunkin."

But there was no doubt at headquarters that slashing "Donuts" was the right choice, according to Tony Weisman, the company's chief marketing officer.

"I wasn't worried about the outcry," Weisman recently told Business Insider. "We'd done the research. It was a handful of people who felt it was like too much change too fast."

Weisman said that when he joined Dunkin' in late 2017, the chain's rebranding efforts were already underway. Dunkin' had been working with various firms to try to modernize its logo, producing mockups that Weisman said "didn't feel right." The company had been considering a thinner, angled logo, ditching its recognizable round and puffy pink-and-orange font.

"This is an own-able font," Weisman said of his decision to scrap the proposed modernized logo. "This is recognizable Dunkin' — you can't get rid of that."

Instead, Dunkin' worked with the design agency JRK, as well as BBDO New York and Arc Worldwide, to make other changes. The chain brightened up its packaging, ditching brown bags for white. Dunkin' kept its pink-and-orange color scheme but simplified the logo. Then, there was the biggest change: dropping the "Donuts."


Watch the video: Dunkin Donuts Finally Releases Donut FRIES u0026 MORE New Menu Items (January 2022).