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Meet Joe Sheena: The Genius Behind NeoPapalis

Meet Joe Sheena: The Genius Behind NeoPapalis

Photo by Alex Weiner. Wait, hold up, going back to the pizza for a hot sec. I need this.

I had the chance to interview Joe Sheena, the owner of NeoPapalis, to find out more about what he does and, more importantly, to learn more about his craft. You see, Joe takes pizza seriously. It’s been his life for the past 28 years, and he has no plans on stopping anytime soon. He started with deep dish pizzas, learning from a hired chef, and recently got a degree in thin-crust two years ago from an Italian cooking school in San Francisco. In an attempt to settle the debate, I asked him which preferred: deep dish or thin crust.

“That’s like asking me to pick a favorite child,” he said. (I’m going to pretend that means he likes thin crust more. It’s just the right answer.)

Gif courtesy of media.heavy.com. Party on, thin crust

Clearly Joe knows what he’s doing. So what better way to test it than a competition?

This year, Joe and his son Gabriel competed in the Pizza Competition at the 30th International Pizza Expo in Las Vegas. Joe entered into the “Non-Traditional Division” to showcase a NeoPaps favorite — the North Beach. If you haven’t tried it, you need to stop what you’re doing and go immediately.

It’s ok, I’ll wait.

Photo by Celeste Holben. It’s just so… so beautiful.

I asked Joe to give me a play-by-play of what it takes to actually make the North Beach (hold onto your hard hats, kids). After making the dough, he tops it with a basil garlic butter base, and then adds some honey to lightly sweeten the sauce. On top of that he adds aged asiago, a three cheese blend, mozzarella, gorgonzola and figs. After the pizza finishes cooking he tops it with fresh arugula, shaved parmesan and a balsamic vinaigrette.

Image courtesy of knowyourmeme.com

I know, right?? The judges loved the pizza and it landed him 13th out of the 60 competitors there, only two points away from a top spot in the Northeast division. When I asked if he plans on competing next year he said, “Yup! I think next year we’re going to do a Michigan themed pizza.” Cherries will be included. Game over.

To finish the interview, I asked Joe if he had any tips for aspiring pizza-makers. Outside of picking up the phone and speed-dialing Dominos, what can we do to step up our pizza game? “The key is good ingredients,” Joe said. “The techniques you can learn later, but you have to start with fresh ingredients.”

Photo by Celeste Holben. Sorry, got distracted by the pizza again *drooling noises*

Joe Sheena has done an amazing job in making NeoPapalis a hit on campus. If you haven’t gone yet, be sure to check it out — even if it’s only for a solid happy hour. Best of luck to him next year for the competition, and if he wants any volunteers to try that cherry pizza, I’m available. Like anytime available. Please…?

Photo by Celeste Holben

View the original post, Meet Joe Sheena: The Genius Behind NeoPapalis, on Spoon University.

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The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands

Editor&rsquos Notes: This feature initially ran in July 2016. It&rsquos being revisited this week as The Offspring return with their brand-new album, Let the Bad Times Roll. So, sit back as we sift through the slush pile to pinpoint the 100 best pop punk bands of all time.

Punk has always thought of itself as radically progressive, but that&rsquos not really true. Go all the way back to the Sex Pistols and their theatrical rejection of mainstream culture, and you&rsquoll find something that&rsquos a lot more reactionary than people give it credit for. (Malcolm McLaren was a clothes designer who stumbled on a new product and found a new way to package it &mdash nothing revolutionary about that.) Sure, punk became a genuine movement with genuine ethics once bands like Crass and Black Flag and Fugazi came around, but the genre as a whole was never the antithesis of pop culture, no matter how many studs and safety pins it stuck in its thrift-store leather jacket.

All of this is to preemptively silence those readers who might see a list of the &ldquo100 Best Pop Punk Bands&rdquo and immediately cry foul at the premise of the thing. Whatever kind of scene flag you&rsquore so intent on waving, get it out of our faces right now. Pop punk is a legitimate (though admittedly very messy) subgenre that has birthed hundreds of bands since it first came into existence. It&rsquos also an undeniable product of its time and place. Arriving 15 years or so after punk&rsquos initial heyday, pop punk owes its existence to the changes that swept across America in the 1980s and necessitated a different kind of rebellion (or pseudo-rebellion, as it were). Malls sprouted across suburbia, skateboard culture gave jocks and weirdos a common reference point, and that capitalist sentiment that ran roughshod over everything in the Reagan era taught corporations the same lesson that McLaren had learned years earlier: Punk sells.

And boy, did it ever sell. Vans Warped Tour, Hot Topic, Mountain Dew, Famous Stars & Straps &mdash all of these names eventually became as tied up in pop punk as names like Green Day and Blink-182. Not every pop punk band participated in corporate culture, with some as adamant about maintaining their DIY ethics as Fugazi and the Dischord crew were in the &lsquo80s. Still, it&rsquos impossible to divorce the genre entirely from its commodification.

It&rsquos also hard, as we found, to figure out what exactly &ldquopop punk&rdquo really means. Is Operation Ivy a pop punk band, despite their obvious debt to ska? (Yes, we suppose.) What about Bad Religion, who grew up in the suburbs but maintained close ties to hardcore throughout their long career? (No, we guess.) The best we could do was come up with a sort of gut test: If the band seems more pop punk than anything else, they get to stay. This obviously led to a lot of tough cuts (and a lot of arguing), but rest assured that we don&rsquot consider Bad Religion the 101st best pop punk band ever.

Otherwise, if you don&rsquot find your favorite band on this list, it&rsquos probably because they suck or never made it outside your rinky-dink hometown. That&rsquos fine. Just post a link to their Bandcamp in the comments section and let people figure it out for themselves. DIY or die, right?

&ndashCollin Brennan
Associate Editor


Watch the video: Prof Bruce Clarke interviewed by Dr. Asijit Datta on Gaian Systems, Autopoiesis and Neocybernetics (January 2022).