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Garlic Scape Risotto

Garlic Scape Risotto

Garlic scapes add rich flavor to creamy risotto.MORE+LESS-

ByScaron

Updated August 4, 2016

Ingredients

2

tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1/2

cup garlic scapes (cut into 1/4 inch rounds)

4

cups chicken broth or stock

Salt and pepper, to taste

1/4

cup chopped fresh sage

1/2

cup freshly grated Romano cheese

Steps

Hide Images

  • 1

    In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the garlic scapes and cook, stirring occasionally, for five minutes. Stir in the rice and let toast for one minute. Pour in the wine and stir. Allow the wine to fully absorb into the rice.

  • 2

    Meanwhile, heat the chicken broth in a pan to warm over low heat. Once the wine is absorbed into the rice, begin adding it to the rice mixture one ladle at a time. Allow the broth to be fully absorbed into the rice after each edition (you'll hear a sizzle when its all absorbed). Be patient. Part of making risotto is waiting for it … and it’s totally worth the wait. All in all, this will take about 25 minutes.

  • 3

    Once all of the broth has been added and absorbed, stir in salt and pepper, the sage and the cheese. Cover and cook for 2-3 more minutes. Remove from heat and serve immediately.

Nutrition Information

No nutrition information available for this recipe


28 Recipes Using Garlic Scapes

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One of the reasons I started this blog was to provide practical support for local eating.

Eating locally means you're eating foods in season--when they taste the best! It also means you're introduced to new foods. At the start of the farmer's market and CSA season these funny looking garlic scapes are many folks' first experience with a new food.


I'm so pleased with this Garlic Scape Recipe Round Up! Right here in one a single place I've gathered more than 28 recipes using this wonderfully versatile and locally available plant part.

Pin this for later!


This amazing photo is from Stephanie of Garden Therapy


My fellow food bloggers and I share what you can fix if you have scapes from your garden (it's easy to grow your own garlic), your Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm share, or your farmer's market. Garlic scapes are ready to harvest all at once, only once a year, so it's a good idea to have a mess of ideas in your toolkit so you can plan ahead in the kitchen.


I've broken down the recipes by category [because cataloging recipes seems to be something I like to do on this blog]. I've got pestos, starters, sides and mains. There are garlic scape recipes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. There are gluten free and vegan recipes using garlic scapes. There are recipes for stove top, oven, microwave, and grill.

For even more recipes using garlic scapes, please see my Garlic and Garlic Scape Recipes Collection. It's part of the Visual Recipe Index by Ingredient, a resource for folks like me eating from the farm share, the farmer's market, the garden, the neighbor's garden, and great deals on ugly produce at the grocery store.


I'm sharing more recipes on my Pinterest boards, follow me there. If you like a good peek behind the scenes like I do, follow me on Instagram. Need a good read? I'm sharing articles of interest on my Facebook page, follow me there. Want to know How to Use This Blog?


My favorite way to use garlic scapes is to put up a mess of Garlic Scape Pistachio Pesto. I freeze it into small cubes and use it year round in salad dressings, Chicken Garlic Scape Meatballs, pizza sauces, Herbed Garlic Scape Cream Cheese Spread/Dip, my Cheesy Garlic Scape Pesto Flatbread, Grilled Garlic Scape Pesto Smashed Potatoes, Shrimp and Garlic Scape Pesto Scampi, and this hummus. I've got a quick video how I make it, and you can find the Garlic Scape Pistachio Pesto recipe specifics here.


1. What to Do with Garlic Scapes to Tame Their Punch

The first thing to understand about garlic scapes is that their garlicky punch can be a little be too pungent for some. Want proof? Though my boyfriend and I both gobbled up the pasta we tossed with scape pesto for dinner last week, after dinner, he carefully begged that we "take the next few nights off from the powerful stuff."

Luckily, there's an easy way to learn how to cook garlic scapes so you won't have to brush your teeth three times after eating them. (Yes, that happened, and even still, the pervasive flavor lingered.)

"The best way to tame their bite is to blanch them," says our Food Editor, Rhoda Boone. "They become milder and sweeter when cooked. Just put them in salted boiling water for about 30 seconds then remove and place into an ice bath to stop the cooking." From there you can use them as planned.


7 Things To Do with Garlic Scapes Recipe | The Crisper Whisperer

There's no use in trying to hide it, so I'm just gonna go ahead and lay it on you from the start. I get a little unnaturally excited about garlic scapes—the way some people do about football teams or politics or hamburgers. A handful of years ago, I was a passably respectable corporate lawyer who had never even heard of scapes. Then somehow I became a crazy CSA lady. Fast-forward to last spring, when the economy was imploding and everyone was feeling grimmer than usual. I made and froze like a dozen batches of scape pesto and I am not kidding when I say that the prospect of cracking them open one by one in the depths of winter to stir into twelve steaming pots of pasta gave me a sense of hope that no friend or news report or even chocolate cake could give.

Whew! That felt good. I feel like I can really talk to you guys. So. Thanks for that.

In one sense, scapes are to garlic as fusilli is to rigatoni: the crazy-bastard college buddy who never really embraced adulthood, the one you catch up with by phone once or twice a year. Scapes are the shoots that grow out of the ground from hard-neck varieties of garlic. When they're young and tender, they look like curly green stalks with tightly closed buds on top. Farmers and gardeners harvest them at this time of year so that they won't drain nutrients from the garlic bulbs that will be dug up in a couple of months, plump and glorious and ready for drying.

But scapes offer more than a slightly rowdy alternative to garlic. Because of their substantial heft as opposed to garlic cloves, they are vegetable, aromatic, and even herb all in one. If you get some from your CSA, happen upon a giant pile of them at the farmers' market, or snip them from your garden, don't politely look the other way. Grab a handful and give one of these ideas a try.

1. Scape Pesto

Far and away my favorite use for garlic scapes is pesto, either straight-up or mixed with herbs like basil and dill. Pesto showcases raw scapes in all their glory. Scape pesto can be very pungent, but it mellows substantially after a few months in the freezer. I like it best in the middle of winter, but I think that's one part mellowing and two parts deprivation. You can find my scape pesto recipe below.

2. Grilled Scapes

Another great, and very different, way to showcase scapes is to grill them, tossed with a little olive oil, salt, and pepper, over direct heat for about two minutes. Flip them once, halfway through, and finish with an extra sprinkle of flaky salt and maybe a bit of lemon juice and zest. They'll be charred in spots and just soft enough, and their flavor will have sweetened and mellowed dramatically. Grilled scapes are surprisingly reminiscent of asparagus, and surprisingly different from raw scapes.

3. Scape Hummus

For the same reason they work well in pesto, scapes are a brilliant swap-in for garlic in your favorite homemade hummus. I think they work especially well in a lemony, tahini-free hummus, which really gives them a chance to shine. Edamame "hummus" with scapes works nicely too, and color coordination is tough to argue with.

4. Scape Compound Butter

Scapes would make a lovely compound butter with a little lemon and maybe some fresh thyme. You could use the butter to make a tarted-up garlic bread, and I can't think of much (except maybe fruit—I do have some boundaries) that could be tossed on the grill but not finished with a nice slice of this melting goodness.

5. Scapes as aromatic

To take a more utilitarian approach, you can slice scapes to whatever length you like and use them as you would garlic, as an aromatic in a wide variety of recipes. Scapes lose a lot of their bite when sautéed, more so than garlic cloves, so use at least three or four times as much scape-age as you would clove-age.

6. Scapes as Vegetable

Scapes also work well as a vegetable, cut into lengths and added to stir-fries or blanched and added to salads, much as you might use green beans. They're chameleons among vegetables, I tell you, though not karma chameleons. Karma-wise, they're all good.

7. Scape Soup

Finally, I'd be remiss if I didn't point you toward Melissa Clark's recipe for double-garlic soup, which uses both scapes and green garlic. If you're not finding green garlic in the market anymore, you could improvise with a few garlic cloves and a handful of a pungent spring green like arugula or watercress.


Recipes That Make The Most Of Garlic Scapes

If you find yourself staring at a garlic scape thinking, "WTF is that?" don't worry. You're not alone. They might be something of a mystery to many, but garlic scapes are worth getting to know. They're twisty, curly, bright green stems that shoot up from garlic bulbs. They are also sometimes called garlic shoots, stems, spears, or, our favorite, serpent garlic.

The garlic that we all know and love has separate cloves and papery skin. That stuff starts out as green garlic (or spring garlic), before it matures. The bulb and roots grow underground while a stem, leaves and scapes soak up sunshine up above.

Obviously, garlic is amazing for lots of reasons, but here's our favorite one: the whole plant is edible. This includes the scapes, which are treats that come along early each summer in markets and CSAs. Using the whole plant isn't only trendy, it's responsible and will open your horizons. Garlic scapes, you win this one.

Scapes taste (duh) like garlic, but a bright, fresh, verdant version of it. You can use them anywhere you'd use regular garlic. So is there any real reason you should buy garlic scapes instead of garlic? Cooking with garlic scapes is like getting to have scallions that taste like garlic -- so yes, go get some while they're around!


Garlic Scapes vs. Ramps

Ramps, also called wild leeks or ramson, are often confused with garlic scapes because they&aposre somewhat similar in appearance and they are both available in the spring. Both ramps and garlic scapes are part of the allium family, which includes onions, shallots, and garlic. However, ramps and garlic scapes are two different plants and not the same: Garlic scapes are specifically the tops of the garlic bulb, while ramps consist of a whole plant that tastes similar to a cross between leek, onion, and garlic.


Place stock in a medium saucepan. Bring to a simmer (do not boil). Keep warm over low-medium heat.

Brown sausage in a large rimmed skillet over medium heat. Once browned, drain excess grease if needed. Add shallots and peppers. Cook 1-2 minutes.

Stir in rice, and cook for 1-2 minutes, stirring constantly. Add wine and cook about 2 minutes or until liquid is nearly absorbed, stirring constantly.

Continue by adding stock, ½ cup at a time, stirring constantly until each portion of stock is absorbed before adding the next. Add the garlic scapes with the last portion of stock. Remove risotto from heat and stir in the cheese.


How to Cook Garlic Scapes & Garlic Scapes Recipe with Lemon Butter

Fiesty little things, no? These are garlic scapes. In late spring/ early summer, they pop up at farmer’s markets and CSA boxes all over the country. If you see them, grab a bunch. What a seasonal treat!

So, what are they?

Garlic scapes are the shoots of a growing garlic bulb, They look like long, green spirals with scraggly tips. Sometimes, they even have buds at the end. What’s interesting, is that garlic is harvested twice: one for the curly scapes and the other for the bulb itself.

What do Garlic Scapes Taste Like?

When cooked, they are mild and slightly sweet in flavor (think roasted garlic) and boast an asparagus-like texture. Such a unique combo. When served raw, such as a garlic scape pesto, they are a bit more pungent.

Recipes to try?

There are several ways to prepare garlic scapes they make an excellent vegetable side dish.

You’ll love this simple recipe with lemon butter. It requires zero planning and very little effort. Ready in under 10 minutes! It’s an excellent introduction.

PS: Garlic scapes also delicious grilled (serve with steak!), used as a pizza topping or diced into cheesy omelettes. No matter how you prepare them, the smell of warm, fragrant garlic will tantalize your senses. Delicious.


Recipes That Make The Most Of Garlic Scapes

If you find yourself staring at a garlic scape thinking, "WTF is that?" don't worry. You're not alone. They might be something of a mystery to many, but garlic scapes are worth getting to know. They're twisty, curly, bright green stems that shoot up from garlic bulbs. They are also sometimes called garlic shoots, stems, spears, or, our favorite, serpent garlic.

The garlic that we all know and love has separate cloves and papery skin. That stuff starts out as green garlic (or spring garlic), before it matures. The bulb and roots grow underground while a stem, leaves and scapes soak up sunshine up above.

Obviously, garlic is amazing for lots of reasons, but here's our favorite one: the whole plant is edible. This includes the scapes, which are treats that come along early each summer in markets and CSAs. Using the whole plant isn't only trendy, it's responsible and will open your horizons. Garlic scapes, you win this one.

Scapes taste (duh) like garlic, but a bright, fresh, verdant version of it. You can use them anywhere you'd use regular garlic. So is there any real reason you should buy garlic scapes instead of garlic? Cooking with garlic scapes is like getting to have scallions that taste like garlic -- so yes, go get some while they're around!


Spring Pea Risotto with Garlic Scape Butter

A sweet, salty, creamy risotto with a garlicky spike.

Ingredients

  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 4 strips Bacon
  • 1 whole Medium Onion, Chopped
  • 1-½ cup Arborio Rice
  • 1-½ cup Dry White Wine
  • 5 cups Chicken Or Vegetable Stock
  • 1 cup Grated Parmesan Cheese
  • 1 teaspoon Freshly Ground Black Pepper, Or To Taste
  • ½ teaspoons Salt, Or To Taste
  • 2 cups Peas, Fresh Or Frozen
  • 5 whole Garlic Scapes
  • 2 sticks Unsalted Butter, Softened

Preparation

First, prep:
* Get peas, wine, out
* Cut 3-4 slices of bacon into strips
* Dice onion
* Take 2 stick of butter out of the fridge

Then, cook:
* Get out a dutch oven or heavy saucepan, put over medium heat.

* Put stock in a pot (or the teapot, makes adding it to the rice easier) and heat up (but not to boiling/simmering. Just hot.). Leave it on the heat.

* Add a drizzle of olive oil + bacon to the dutch oven. Cook until bacon is done but not super-crispy or burned. Remove bacon to paper towels. If there’s more than 2-3 Tbsp of fat in the pot, pour out the extra.

* Add the onion. Saute for a few minutes until it starts to get see-thru.

* Add 1 ½ cups of rice. Toss to coat it all in fat. Cook for about 5 minutes. If the rice starts to brown the heat is too high. Eventually, the rice will look like it has a see-thru coating – that means it’s coated in the fat.

* Turn heat up to medium/medium high. Pour in 1 c. of wine. Stir until wine is pretty much all absorbed. At this point, start adding 1-2 ladles of stock at a time. Stir. When stock is mostly absorbed, add more. Stir. Add stock. Continue.

* Taste about 15 minutes in. Rice should be almost done. Add the peas so they can finish cooking with the rice.

* When the rice is done – usually takes 18-20 minutes from when you start adding the stock, you have to judge by tasting it – stir in 1 c. grated parm, black pepper and the bacon. Check for salt (with the bacon and parm, it’s probably fine).

For scape butter: 2 sticks unsalted butter + 5 or 6 garlic scapes + food processor until well blended.

Split between 4 bowls, add a teaspoon or two of scape butter on top. (Or serve as a side, passing scape butter around.)

Save extra scape butter for killer mashed potatoes to put on grilled steak, fish or corn or to make garlic bread or crostini.